FAQ – Competitive

Q
Are we going to be able to compete in 2021?
A

It is our hope and plan to compete this season! (Both in October 2020 for Private Lessons, and in March 2021 for traditional competition events).  That being said competition is expected to look different than in the past.  It is likely that studio’s will compete in set blocks of time (i.e. all Premiere Dances will take place over one or two days), and no head to head competition will take place with other studios (to avoid contact with other studios/cities).  All attendees will be expected to wear masks unless performing on stage, and physical distancing measures will be in effect. Group sizes may be limited while performing (no more super jazz), but our usual lines should be permitted to perform.  This is an evolving situation, but we are optimistic about the future!

Q
What about my competition entry fees from 2020?
A

All entry fees paid in 2020 are being fully credited to the 2021 season with no administration fees.  Should you add routines for this season you will only be billed for that additional entry.

Q
If we are using competitive choreography from last season, what will the dancers be doing in class this year?
A

It is our plan to use most of the choreography from last year for the 2021 Competitive season.  During time in class many routines will need to be adjusted to adapt to social distancing requirements.  Additionally in class we will have time to continue to work on technique in each style as well as work on BATD exam work (jazz, ballet, tap, acro).  We are hopeful that we will be able to offer BATD examinations in December or January.  For more information don’t hesitate to contact us at info@premieredance.ca

Q
I am homeschooling my children this year. Will there be any options for classes during the day?
A

We are happy to offer private and semi private lessons for dancers of all ages during the day.  Please email us at privatelessons@premieredance.ca to submit a request.

Q
What is competitive dancing?
A

Competition offers a higher level of dance training for your child. During the first month of classes students work on basic technique and steps that will be included in their routine. This month is treated like an audition and allows the instructor to get a feel for the group’s level. After that month any adjustments to the group will be made, and any students that do not make the cut will continue in recreational level dancing.

Students will spend the next couple of months learning challenging choreography and then perfecting the performance and presentation of the dance. Our troupe is planning on traveling to four competitions this year in Toronto, Peterborough, Ajax, and Kingston,. At these competitions students will have their routines judged against other routines from other dance schools across Ontario and even the United States.

Q
What is the cost of competition?
A

There are additional costs associated with competitive dancing. First of all, students must take a minimum of three classes per week. These classes depend on the style of dance chosen. (See Below) Secondly, student’s costumes are more elaborate than recreational level costumes. They must be more durable and have original designs as part of a group’s mark is based on their appearance. As a result the cost of a competitive costume is around $150-275 per group. Finally, there are competition entry fees which range from $35.00 to $45.00 per group, per competition. These fees will be collected once it is confirmed which competitions the studio will be attending – usually early October. (Keep in mind that our studio does offer the chance to do fundraising throughout the year in order to subsidize the cost of competition – ask us for more information).

Q
Are 3 classes a week required for all competitive students?
A

In order for you to get the most out of your dance training and improve at a rate that will allow you to be competitive, it is essential that students take 3 minimum of three classes a week. Over the years we have found that this is the perfect amount of time to train when beginning competitive dance. This allows you body to be prepared for the competitions, (such as improve flexibility and technique). Should you want to try more than one competitive class, it is suggested that you also increase your technique classes. Speak to one of our office staff for more information and guidance as to which classes would be best suited for you.

Q
I really want to compete in jazz, why do I have to take other classes?
A

As all other styles of dance depend on the basic technique of ballet, it is essential that all competitive students take ballet class. The only exception to this rule is for competitive hip hop – but even then it is strongly suggested that ballet be one of your three weekly classes. With jazz we also suggest a stretch and technique to work on your flexibility, which is another important component of competitive dance. As per above we have found that one class a week does not provide enough training for a student to be competitive, and that by training in other styles (such as ballet), it creates a strong, technical and well rounded dancer.

Q
I would like to compete with a solo, how do I get this opportunity?
A

Competitive Solo’s duets trio’s etc. are at the discretion of the Studio Director and Instructors. Students must have at least one year of competitive dance experience, and show promise in their chosen discipline. Overall technique, work ethic, flexibility, and personality on stage are also taken into consideration. Priority goes to senior students (aged 13 and up ), and those students taking 7 hours or more per week. For more information please email privatelessons@premieredance.ca

Once again, competition is a very exciting and rewarding way to enjoy dancing. Students cherish the extra opportunities to perform, become part of a team, and love the added technical challenge that these advanced level classes provide.

Q
What is the difference between competitive level 1 & competitive level 2?
A

The different competitive levels are based on dancer ability and time put in at the studio.  Level one dancers are expected to take between 4 and 6 hours of instruction per week.  Level two are expected to take a minimum of 6 or more hours per week.  This allows for all dancer to enjoy the competition environment and be part of our team, but allows them to select the amount of time they wish to dedicate to their team.  Both levels are treated the same within our studio and at competitions with many overall award opportunities.  Competitive Level one is a great way to start your competitive dance experience.